British, Japanese scientists share Nobel Prize for stem cell work
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British, Japanese scientists share Nobel Prize for stem cell work

Toronto : Canada | Oct 08, 2012 at 10:13 PM PDT
Source: Los Angeles Times
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Sir John Gurdon and Dr. Shinya Yamanaka were honored Monday for "the discovery that mature cells can be reprogrammed" to return to a very early state of development, the Nobel committee said in its citation. Their research is still years away from yielding a clear breakthrough in medical treatment.... FULL ARTICLE AT Los Angeles Times
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John Gurdon said his work "was essentially to show that all the different cells of the body have the same genes"
John Gurdon said his work "was essentially to show that all the different cells of the body have the same genes"
 
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