Note to Self: Avoid a Tarantula as a Pet
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Note to Self: Avoid a Tarantula as a Pet

Leeds : United Kingdom | Jan 02, 2010 at 6:40 PM PST
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Chile - Chilean rose tarantula

It may be hard to believe, but some guy in England had a quirky feeling of security in obtaining a Chilean Rose Tarantula as his sidekick.

Well, not much to that relationship until the guy decided house cleaning of the aquarium was in order.

It took an ophthalmologist from the Leeds, England hospital to discover, through intense magnification, what made the man’s eyes watery, red and light sensitive.

The docs discovered hair-like projectiles stuck in the man’s cornea. In an abundance of privacy or shame the man’s name has not been disclosed.

Apparently three weeks prior to the discovery, he had been cleaning out the spider’s tank. Unbeknownst to him, Spidey had not lent his or her approval to this procedure and launched a fine mist toward the intruder.

"He sensed movement in the terrarium. He turned his head and found that the tarantula, which was in close proximity, had released 'a mist of hairs' which hit his eyes and face," the doctors wrote.

According to the medical experts, his diagnosis is rare. (Really!)

The Chilean Rose tarantula releases the barbed hair on the back of its body to defend against predators.

"We suggest that tarantula keepers be advised to routinely wear eye protection when handling these animals," the doctors said.

How about suggesting avoiding the exposure all together?

No word on whether the pet owner squashed the bug.

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Chilean Rose Tarantula
The Pet of some stu... guy in England.
Nathaniel Hines is based in Florianópolis, Santa Catarina, Brazil, and is an Anchor on Allvoices.
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