The false chimera of a brokered Republican convention
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The false chimera of a brokered Republican convention

New York City : NY : USA | Feb 14, 2012 at 5:28 AM PST
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Vice Presidential Candidate Gov. Sarah Palin (AK) Full Speech at the RNC

The idea of having the Republican Convention going well enough beyond the first ballot without producing consensus on a candidate appears to have increasing appeal to some conservative commentators. But would there be any advantage to having a brokered convention produce a compromise candidate drafted from some ephemeral list of alternate choices from those who will have endured over a year of the primary season with its travails, trials, exposure and disclosures?

Granted, a compromise candidate would have been spared the barbs and scorn from the press and thus may have the appearance of a clean slate. They would be able to take that magic combination of a base from Mitt Romney’s best policy positions, moderated by a smattering of Ron Paul's financial and foreign policy restraint, with a moral spine from Rick Santorum, adding some spice and disdain for slanted posing of the press from Newt Gingrich’s arrogant ripostes, and then fill in the gaps with Tea Party banter and smooth it all out with classic Republican rhetoric.

Such a candidate would be a package of goods assembled a few short months before Election Day which may allow them the advantage of not being pinned down and fully vetted by an overly aggressive press. So, what could possibly be the problem with such a candidate? It appears on paper to be all benefits with little risk, a kind of the best of all worlds rolled neatly into one assembled package.

It is the best of all worlds rolled up into one neatly assembled package that would be the problem.

Such a candidate would have all the appeal of a dress-up doll. Such a candidate would compare to President Obama in the same manner as a maniken shows off a clothing line compared to a model walking the runway. President Obama comes off well-spoken and relates well with the crowds when on the campaign. He may not be all that smooth when it comes to actually doing the job of president, but he can sound and appear very presidential on the campaign trail. He will be as polished as polished can be.

Hand-picking a candidate outside of those who endured the primary campaign and paid their dues to get the nomination will give the impression of a manufactured candidate which would be a grave misstep against President Obama. By the time the Republican Convention rolls around at the end of the summer, the primary contest will present well-vetted and known entities, and the American people will expect one of these who have persevered and gained the support of at least a significant portion of the Republican electorate to be acknowledged and chosen to carry on to the election.

To place somebody chosen in what we refer to as smoke-filled backrooms filled with faceless impersonal powerbrokers would be an insult to those who had toiled with their chosen candidate through the trials and tribulations to get to the convention. Such a move would be perceived as insult by many conservatives who have faith in a system which includes the votes and voices of the people. If we did not want to have a real influence in choosing the eventual candidate for president from our party, then we would not spend the time, effort, and wealth in a primary campaign season and would not even bother with a convention, we would just rent a conference room at a Motel 6 and be done with it.

But there is an even better argument against the brokered convention: Who? Simply, who? Give me the name of who it is that would be such a magnificent name that they would have the vast numbers of voters necessary to win the election and emerge as the candidate of candidates. Bobby Jindal? Chris Christie? Paul Ryan? Sarah Palin? Glenn Beck? Rush Limbaugh? Clint Eastwood; after the Super Bowl commercial, why not?

Really, who is there that would make such a wonderful candidate that it would be worth throwing all the toils and tribulations suffered by those who sweat and bled through the grueling primary endurance trial a wise and intelligent move? No, a brokered convention would be the closest thing to a disaster as the Republicans could pull. We need to continue with the people who have shown the willingness to ante-up and play the hand they are dealt. We need to choose from the warriors who have taken up their armor and survived the barbs and arrows of outrageous fortune and earned the right to represent the Republican voters on the ballot this fall, or is the plan to broker away the people’s trust and support? Note, they are the Republican Party candidates but they represent the voters who came out and supported them in the primaries. No brokered candidate can make that claim.

Beyond the Cusp

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Santorum is hoping to be able to consolidate the support of the Republican party's social conservatives
Santorum is hoping to be able to consolidate the support of the Republican party's social conservatives
beyondthecusp is based in Paw Paw, Michigan, United States of America, and is an Anchor on Allvoices.
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