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GOP congressman slams his party, says it's 'incapable of governing' and panders to 'extremists'

One brave Republican has broken ranks to slam his party for what he called "taking severe sides," to the detriment of the GOP brand.

Speaking to the Syracuse Post Standard, New York Rep. Richard Hanna reportedly said he is frustrated with some in his party who are pandering to "extremists," and he singled out fellow Congresswoman for Minnesota Michele Bachmann's latest wild accusation about Secretary of State Hillary Rodham-Clinton's aide Huma Abedin.

The Post Standard story went on to describe Hanna's disgust with Bachmann's unsubstantiated rants about Abedin, (wife of former disgraced N.Y. Rep. Anthony Weiner) having ties with the Muslim Brotherhood, saying this latest pandering showed how off the rails his Republican party had gone in order to "give deferential treatment to our extremes in this moment of history."

He is referring to Bachmann and recent letter by four other Republicans--Lynn Westmoreland (Ga.), Thomas Rooney (Fla.), Trent Franks (Ariz.) and Louie Gohmert (Texas) sent to five federal agencies alleging that the Muslim Brotherhood had infiltrated the U.S. government as part of their sinister, subversive plot.

Another Republican, Texas Rep. Debbie Riddle, was rattled in a 2011 interview by CNN's AC360's host Anderson Cooper, when he grilled her about a similarly wacky plot of “Anchor Babies” by illegal immigrants born here for the sole purpose of growing up to be "home-grown terrorists." Legislation was even written to deal with this perceived threat and one of the legislators behind the Muslim Brotherhood loony smear campaign, Louie Gohmert of Texas, was also instrumental in the Anchor Babies allegations.

(Read more and see Riddle/Cooper interview here: Terror Babies | Anderson Cooper | Debbie Riddle).

Hanna, who defeated the Democratic incumbent Michael Acuri two years ago, expressed sadness at the way Washington operates and said his first year in Congress was very disappointing because of the "divisiveness on both sides of the aisle."

The representative for New York's 24th Congressional District is not a career politician and was a businessman who ran Hanna Construction, a multi-million company he started after college, before he threw his hat into the congressional race in 2010.

Seems his two years on Capitol Hill has soured him to the way both parties do the business of politics, but said he felt more bitterness coming from his own party than the Democrats, saying, "I would say that the friends I have in the Democratic party I find--much more congenial--a little less anger."

Hanna had some more harsh words for fellow Republicans, adding, "We render ourselves incapable of governing when all we do is take severe sides--if all people do is go down there to join a team and the team is invested in winning and you have something that looks very similar to the shirts and the skins, there's not a lot of value there."

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